Tag Archives: Brandwatch

Vizia 2 featured content

Beautiful data visualisation – the way to employees’ hearts?

I did a 5 minute talk the other day as part of a Show and Tell. The talk was on the Twitter account I’d just re-launched, why I was doing it, and what I hoped to get out of it. After the talk one of the internal communications team came over and asked if he could put some of my slides up on the digital screens around the building.

That was great – a result – some engagement! And someone was actually listening to my talk. But of course I started thinking about how relatively unexciting the slides were and wishing I could put be putting something really eye-catching up on those screens.

It’s increasingly common for businesses and organisations to have display screens in their reception areas, lifts and other high-footfall parts of the building. This internal network (aka digital signage) needs content. And not bland corporate videos or 1984 style maxims either. These screens need something that grabs the attention, engages and entertains.

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Ready for #NYKConf

5 things I learnt at NYK Europe

You never know what to expect from a brand-organised conference. A little bit of hard sell, a whole lot of soft sell, maybe some interesting speakers, possibly nice people, undoubtedly decent catering and an ok sort of venue. That’s pretty much the best case scenario.

NYK Europe, the new social media intelligence conference from Brandwatch delivered on all those fronts. And probably more. It was nice to spend time with lots of other people deeply interested in social media analytics and consumer marketing insights (yes, leaving the rest of you FREE to party on without us)!

Here are five things I learned:

1. The key to meaningful innovation is empathy – Clara Gaggero and her magician husband Adrian Westaway designed the only phone manual ever to be put on display at MOMA. After observing elderly people struggling to un-box and set up new mobile phones, they made two hard-bound books which the sim card and phone could be placed into, creating a fun, interactive process with packaging, gadget and instruction all blended into one. Such a cool, simple idea.

2. Some nice lines to use about working with influencers: “Influence is contextual. It’s not absolute. It’s not a commodity. Influence is an eye-dropper: diffusion not infection. It’s all about planting a seed”. Thanks Dr Paul Siegel! Influencer marketing is still so misunderstood – good to be reminded it’s all about relationship-building (a la old school PR) not sledge hammers.

3. “Social for good” is something we can all be working towards: it’s all about using social data to solve read world problems. Yes, thanks Edward Crook (research manager, Brandwatch) – let’s have some more of that!

4. A 25 year old man can be a global figurehead for challenging gender stereotypes. Liam Hackett has been working with Brandwatch to research misogynistic language online and see how it impacts on men as well as women. Their first report was published in January. More collaborative work is coming. Liam’s agency worked with Lynx on a new tone of voice – as revealed in the aftershave’s latest campaign, Find Your Magic.

5. Mark Zuckerberg may have come to the party late, but he really knows what he’s doing with virtual reality. I hadn’t seen this latest video but its clear that the marriage between Oculus’ technology and Facebook’s 1 billion strong marketplace is frighteningly powerful. Meanwhile, if Twitter doesn’t innovate fast, we could all be deleting our accounts. Just two stories I heard on NYK’s savvy audience grapevine.

Thanks for having me, Brandwatch! Look forward to the next one.

Jacqueline Gold on Twitter

The Top 100 UK CEOs on Twitter

However faddy influencer marketing might have become, the concept of influence is a useful one – anything that gets us away from vanity metrics (Get me 1m followers now – I don’t care who they are!) and onto something more meaningful has to be a bonus.

Influence is a metric social media marketers can actually work with – and something non-experts can easily understand. Well, hooray for that.

This week Brandwatch soft-launched Audiences, a product that trawls data from user bios and content on Twitter to bring you instant, real-time insights into who’s leading the conversations that matter to your brand.
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Instagram #shopfrontsofLondon June 2016

Setting up shop as a small business? That’s great. How’s your social media looking?

Like every good meme, the one about the English being shopkeepers lives on because there’s truth in it. Napoleon (or Barère) may have meant it as an insult. But that’s ok, the modern day English/ Brits (in all our diversity) have embraced shopkeeping with open arms. We now own the s-word.

From pubs to tea shops to books, it turns out that running a shop is the number one dream career for UK citizens. Because, let’s face it, who can resist a nice-looking shop? There’s something reassuringly familiar about the carefully arranged shelves, well-chosen products and politely disinterested service.

But what we really want is those elusive freedoms (that have been at the heart of the current heated Brexit debate): independence and autonomy.

Not only do we love the idea of shop-ownership, the UK Government is happy to put shopkeeping firmly at the centre of its economic strategy.
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Find your epic campaign

5 bright content ideas from the UK’s best boutique festivals

The UK festival season has kicked in: everyone’s talking about summer and, if you’re that way inclined, you’ll want tickets to your favourite field party. So how are festival organisers making the most of it? I compared ten of the UK’s top independent events on social media, using Brandwatch to track mentions and hashtags.

Unsurprisingly, there’s a healthy conversation around music festivals in April and May (5980 mentions in total), with a strong contribution from mainstream media (led by online local newspapers).

Kendal Calling and Festival No 6 come out top of the comparison, with volume of mentions roughly in proportion with their social media following. Secret Garden Party does less well – despite having nearly the same number of Twitter fans as Kendall Calling (around 50,000), they generate less than half as many mentions.
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Artisan Coffee Instagram

Artisan wins social media at the London Coffee Festival

The London Coffee Festival is the perfect opportunity for gourmet coffee shops to boost their social media presence. I looked at how ten of London’s leading independents performed on social during this year’s event.

Out of the ten brands, west London coffee shop, Artisan, won the largest share of voice: 31 per cent of the conversation (see fig.i). Artisan has a respectable and engaged Twitter audience (4K) – but nowhere near as many followers as the more established Prufrock and Kaffeine (16K and 15K respectively). So, what was the Stamford Brook & Putney-based coffee shop doing right?
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Marques Almeida

Burberry, McQueen and Marques Almeida are stand-out social media stars at London Fashion Week

The big news from February’s London Fashion Week came from Burberry: this was the last show in which clothes would be previewed for a later season. From September, the public will be able to buy all Burberry clothes as soon as they have appeared on the catwalk. This announcement, and the discussion around it, helped Burberry to a huge share of the online conversation during #LFW16.

There were more than 80 designers showing their Autumn/ Winter lines this week so, to get a snapshot of social media activity, I compared five of the top UK designers with five up and coming labels. I used Brandwatch’s analytics platform to measure variables such as share of voice, output, sentiment and topics. Here’s what I found…

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M's Valentine Chocolates by Cocreatr

It’s not all roses for chocolatiers on Valentine’s Day

Everyone loves something sweet from someone they love – and chocolates are the UK’s most popular Valentine’s gift. So how are chocolatiers using social media to ensure that out of the whopping £1.9 billion UK Valentine’s spend, they get a decent slice of the action?

I looked at eight of the best independent chocolatiers on Twitter to see how they’ve performed in the last month. Here’s what I found (thanks Brandwatch for the data and analytics):

1. In terms of audience, Rococo Chocolates are most loved of business executives, Hotel Chocolat of politicians and Green & Black’s of fitness gurus – so now you know! (See fig.1 for breakdown and more details). Women love Chococo and Hotel Chocolat while men tend to go for Paul A Young or Mast Brothers (both brands with something inherently manly about them).
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Burberry's Christmas 2015 campaign on YouTube has been viewed 12.3m times

Less is more: the social media strategy of luxury brands

Christmas is coming – and luxury brands’ coffers are getting fat. We’re feeling festive so we’re happy to wallow in nostalgia and fantasy. And what’s wrong with that?

Luxury brands do their marketing very differently from everyone else. Whereas for most, social media is a matter of engagement, luxury brands have a different type of relationship with their audience: it’s all about aspiration.

So while an inexpensive fashion brand like (say) George at Asda might be super-chatty and responsive to its audience, Burberry will remain aloof, letting fans and followers do the talking. This is the “velvet rope” approach – discussed in detail in a panel I blogged at London Social Media Week.

This strategy of exclusivity is well-illustrated in a recent report from Brandwatch: Social Insights on the Luxury Fashion Industry. The report analysed more than 200,000 Twitter conversations around luxury fashion brands and found 99.63% of mentions (tweets, replies and retweets) came from consumers, with posts from luxury brands’ Twitter accounts making up just 0.37% of the conversation.

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Bleach London Psychedelic Soho Hair Rave

Bleach London: the ultimate social salon

Creative, visual and consumer-facing – why would hair salons have a problem with social media? But the conversation on social media in the UK is dominated by just one name: Bleach London.

The Dalston salon’s YouTube channel (above) has 4.7K subscribers. It has 50K fans on Twitter, 70K on Facebook and 240K on Instagram. Bleach’s “how to” videos notch up an average of 11K views, and a new hairstyle can be trending on Twitter within hours (witness the excitement around Lottie Tomlinson’s new #RainbowRoots on 5 November).

Just to put Bleach London’s online presence in context, out of the ten UK salons I surveyed, Bleach takes 74 per cent of social mentions (see Brandwatch graphic below). Bleach London’s nearest rival in terms of social voice comes from Mark Hill in Hull – a savvy salon with its own product line in Boots and a staunch fanbase among Geordie Shore cast members. But Mark Hill still only gets 10 per cent of social mentions.

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