Tag Archives: Brandwatch

Burberry's Christmas 2015 campaign on YouTube has been viewed 12.3m times

Less is more: the social media strategy of luxury brands

Christmas is coming – and luxury brands’ coffers are getting fat. We’re feeling festive so we’re happy to wallow in nostalgia and fantasy. And what’s wrong with that?

Luxury brands do their marketing very differently from everyone else. Whereas for most, social media is a matter of engagement, luxury brands have a different type of relationship with their audience: it’s all about aspiration.

So while an inexpensive fashion brand like (say) George at Asda might be super-chatty and responsive to its audience, Burberry will remain aloof, letting fans and followers do the talking. This is the “velvet rope” approach – discussed in detail in a panel I blogged at London Social Media Week.

This strategy of exclusivity is well-illustrated in a recent report from Brandwatch: Social Insights on the Luxury Fashion Industry. The report analysed more than 200,000 Twitter conversations around luxury fashion brands and found 99.63% of mentions (tweets, replies and retweets) came from consumers, with posts from luxury brands’ Twitter accounts making up just 0.37% of the conversation.

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Bleach London Psychedelic Soho Hair Rave

Bleach London: the ultimate social salon

Creative, visual and consumer-facing – why would hair salons have a problem with social media? But the conversation on social media in the UK is dominated by just one name: Bleach London.

The Dalston salon’s YouTube channel (above) has 4.7K subscribers. It has 50K fans on Twitter, 70K on Facebook and 240K on Instagram. Bleach’s “how to” videos notch up an average of 11K views, and a new hairstyle can be trending on Twitter within hours (witness the excitement around Lottie Tomlinson’s new #RainbowRoots on 5 November).

Just to put Bleach London’s online presence in context, out of the ten UK salons I surveyed, Bleach takes 74 per cent of social mentions (see Brandwatch graphic below). Bleach London’s nearest rival in terms of social voice comes from Mark Hill in Hull – a savvy salon with its own product line in Boots and a staunch fanbase among Geordie Shore cast members. But Mark Hill still only gets 10 per cent of social mentions.

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Beauty and the (social) beast: why do salons struggle to get social media marketing right?

Spa Accents by Karl Cossio

According to latest research from Habia (the government appointed sector skills body), seventy per cent of UK beauty salons use some sort of ICT in running their business. The vast majority of salons who use a computer use it for their company website (77 per cent), for Facebook (73 per cent) and/ or for Twitter (27 per cent).

Marketing and promotion skills are cited as the number one priority in terms of skills business owners would like their staff to have (68 per cent of business owners), but most salons don’t have any kind of training plan or a training budget. I’m taking a wild guess they don’t have a social media marketing strategy either.

I took a sample of ten independent beauty salons and used Brandwatch to track how they performed on social media over one month. The salons are spread across the UK so aren’t directly competing with each other – but I wanted to get a UK-wide feel for best practice – to find who has the best share of voice on social, if you like.

Here’s what I found…

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Mission Accomplished by Anthony Quintano

Nonprofits: the good, the bad and the ugly

As I mentioned in the last post, social media for nonprofits should be like shooting fish in a barrel: “Bingo!” every time. We all love to get behind a good cause – the problem these days is exactly which cause to choose.

Campaigns like the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge (above) went viral due to a number of factors: a great visual stunt, celebrity support, timing (it was August 2014 – the height of summer in most English-speaking countries).

But for most nonprofits, success is not so much about making one massive splash then receding from public view – it’s more like the drip-drip of a constant current: having a place in the public consciousness, year in, year out.
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Orla Kiely x Uniqlo (via @wishwishwish)

Influencer marketing – or good old fashioned PR?

In the olden days, or at least as long ago as 2005, the formula was simple: send out a press release to journalists and follow up with a phone call. Play it right and you’d see your client’s name in print. Timing and context were essential, plus the strength of your story, and the depth of your relationship with the journalist.

What’s changed? Very little actually. A good story presented to the right person at the right time will still be passed on, but the mechanism of presentation is completely different.

We no longer deal in press releases, but in the essence of an idea. And the “right” person is no longer necessarily a journalist, he or she is just as likely to be a blogger, a vlogger, a Viner or a Pinner. Or something else entirely. Or a mixture of things.
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