Tag Archives: fake news

PRWeek Crisis Comms panel

How to deal with a PR crisis

If you’re a small business owner like me, it’s hard to imagine a time when one corporate mis-step might generate headlines. But a PR crisis can affect anyone, whatever the size of your organisation. It’s good to at least be aware of potential threats. What risks are you exposed to? What things could possibly go wrong? And how would you handle it if they did?

PRWeek’s Crisis Communications event on Wednesday (above) was a sharp reminder that none of us can ever take goodwill for granted.

Kirsten Walkom from Save the Children talked about how charities are currently struggling with the halo effect – presuming public trust in them will be higher than it actually is. This perception gap isn’t helping as the charity world faces an unprecedented series of crises: from Save The Children suffering legal action for rescuing migrants at sea to Amnesty International mistreating and bullying staff to the grim ongoing allegations against Oxfam.

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Resistance is fertile. Especially on social media

Last week, a single tweet from the Antarctic gained 9 thousand retweets in just a few days. Data scientist Linda Zunas organised an Antarctica march on Saturday 21 January as part of the global Women’s March.

Zunas’ tweet shows a photo of her colleagues on board their expedition ship, preparing for the march.  Each of them holds a placard with a message: “Men for the earth”, “Save the planet”, “Seals for science” or “Penguins for peace”.

Zunas’ photo neatly sums up the diversity of voices that the Women’s March came to represent. It was a phenomenal protest, spreading across 7 continents and attracting more than 2 million people (some estimates say 4.8 million). And it was all started by an Hawaiian grandmother who posted an idea on Facebook back in November 2016.
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free hugs by ken green

A tech manifesto for love and peace

If you’ve read many blog posts, either here or at interactiveknowhow, you’ll know I’ve always liked to see social media as a force for good: a means of helping us become more transparent, open, collaborative and connected.

Of course, social media is also a marketing tool. And it’s interesting that angry, divisive, polarised messaging is doing so brilliantly at present. In terms of truth and openness, November 2016 will go down in history as a seminal month: the month no-holds-barred emotion officially became ‘better’ than actual facts.

In November, ‘post-truth’ became Oxford Dictionaries’ word of the year as we saw our world go full ‘Black Mirror’.  Donald Trump credited Facebook and Twitter with winning the US election, social networks struggled to control fake news, Silicon Valley witnessed the Tech CEOs’ nightmare – a president totally at odds with their values, and, oh yes, Tila Tequila was suspended from Twitter. I’m quoting that last one not so much for the absurdity of a forgotten celebrity making headlines again but because someone suddenly thinks it’s ok to be neo-nazi.
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