Tag Archives: inequality

Meaning 2015 audience

Is your social purpose more than skin deep?

There’s a lot of it about.

In January, Edelman’s Trust Barometre said the UK was at an all time low in terms of public trust for charities, NGOs, business and media. The PR giant recommended companies demonstrate clear personal and societal benefits, and behave with integrity, in order to build trust.

In February, the PRCA ran a packed-out event, Should Brand PR Have A Higher Purpose?, where the likes of Coca-cola and McDonalds argued that social purpose was core to their business strategies. (There’s a good write-up on Gorkana by the panel chair, Ruth Allchurch.)

In June, I went to the launch of Reclaiming Agency - a report on the future of advertising. The report concluded that advertising creatives should start using their collective nous to address sustainability, inequality, poverty and other big social issues facing the world.

Not to be outdone, in September, marketing and media industry bible The Drum relaunched with a brand new strapline: How Marketing Can Change The World.

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Britain’s popular culture goes posh – can social stop the rot?

Working class hero
Apparently, our popular culture is in danger of gentrification.

The most shocking stat in Sean O’Hagan’s recent article, A working class hero is something to be…but not in Britain’s posh culture, was that 60% of current successful rock and pop acts were former public school pupils, compared with just 1% 20 years ago.

The article goes on to state that the paths taken by the many British cultural icons with working class roots – like Julie Walters, Tracey Emin, Dizzee Rascal or Alexander McQueen – simply aren’t available today.

The introduction of university fees, the end of grammar schools and prohibitive inner city rents means it’s tougher than ever for bright children from poorer families to find opportunities to work and develop alongside like-minded people.

Can social media to anything to help level the playing field? Of course, I’m an evangelist, so I’d like to think so. Lauren Luke and Jamal Edwards are just two examples of working class kids who’ve found fame and fortune through talent, hard work and YouTube.

But nothing’s going to happen until they start teaching social media properly in schools, and by the look of things that’s a long way off.

Photo: Dominic Campbell