Tag Archives: Instagram

Pepsi image wall in Brandwatch

Image search: the next generation of social listening

As video and images come to dominate social media, social listening tools need to adapt. It’s a sign of the visual times that Brandwatch is introducing logo recognition to its monitoring dashboard.

The new “Image Insights” tool (see this guide for info) allows users to find images shared on Twitter that contain their brand’s logo – or those of their competitors.

For big brands, this is exciting stuff.

If you’re Pepsi, for example, you’d be able to see that your logo has featured in more than 8 thousand images posted on Twitter in the last 28 days. The screenshot above shows a selection – this is exactly what Pepsi’s marketing team would see on their new Brandwatch dashboard.

For event marketers who value “amount of media exposure generated” and “awareness of brand” as ROI metrics for sponsorships, being able to track visual mentions is essential.

And for brands trying to allocate media spend (billboards, product placement or team jersey sponsorship?), the image wall gives an indication as to which method generates the greatest impact.

Instagram image insights are coming soon. As for video image search, that’s still a way off, but the bar has been set by Google – it’s new machine learning API recognises objects in videos. Social listening tools can’t afford to be too far behind.

Are brands ready for Instagram Stories

Are brands ready for Instagram Stories?

Social media consultants used to talk about the difference between “broadcasting” and “listening”. You don’t hear that so much any more. One of the reasons Twitter isn’t the fun it used to be is the reversion to broadcast across so many profiles. (Combined with the rise of trolling – which makes Twitter like a party full of bores and bullies. And who wants that?)

One reason brands broadcast is because they can’t actually “listen”. Not in the true sense of the word. You can have all the monitoring systems you want, all the data gathering, all the analytics, but you can still completely miss the point.

Like puzzled parents trying to chime in with their kids’ conversations, or the proverbial dad on the dancefloor, many brands may need to face up to the harsh reality that they can never really be cool. At least, not that cool.  Not achingly hip, blink and it’s over, cool.

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Artisan Coffee Instagram

Artisan wins social media at the London Coffee Festival

The London Coffee Festival is the perfect opportunity for gourmet coffee shops to boost their social media presence. I looked at how ten of London’s leading independents performed on social during this year’s event.

Out of the ten brands, west London coffee shop, Artisan, won the largest share of voice: 31 per cent of the conversation (see fig.i). Artisan has a respectable and engaged Twitter audience (4K) – but nowhere near as many followers as the more established Prufrock and Kaffeine (16K and 15K respectively). So, what was the Stamford Brook & Putney-based coffee shop doing right?
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Marques Almeida

Burberry, McQueen and Marques Almeida are stand-out social media stars at London Fashion Week

The big news from February’s London Fashion Week came from Burberry: this was the last show in which clothes would be previewed for a later season. From September, the public will be able to buy all Burberry clothes as soon as they have appeared on the catwalk. This announcement, and the discussion around it, helped Burberry to a huge share of the online conversation during #LFW16.

There were more than 80 designers showing their Autumn/ Winter lines this week so, to get a snapshot of social media activity, I compared five of the top UK designers with five up and coming labels. I used Brandwatch’s analytics platform to measure variables such as share of voice, output, sentiment and topics. Here’s what I found…

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How to create a workplace built on trust

Dareconf_28Sep_105

Dare Conference has been going for three years but this is the first year I’ve been able to attend. It seems unique among conferences in that it focuses on collaborative business culture from a digital/ geek standpoint. Founder Jonathan Kahn used to be a web designer, but he grew frustrated at the disconnect between espoused workplace values and the reality – and set up DareConf to bridge that gap.

The first thing about DareConf is that it’s great for networking (in the best sense of the word): getting the chance to connect with like-minded people on a deeper level than you might do at a purely speaker-focused event.

The conference is a mix of presenter-led talks and interactive workshops (like the one above). The excellent talks – where four people (Rifa Thorpe-Tracey, Laura Morgan, Penny Walker and Holly Burns) spoke about overcoming their own problems at work – set the tone for the interactive sessions.
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A picture paints a thousand words…the phenomenal rise of Pinterest

The great thing about Pinterest is that it’s not only useful on a personal level, it has great applications for business – as Chris Brogan discusses in the clip above.

More than anything else, Pinterest is a search engine that will drive traffic to your site when used in the right way.

Kate Spade and Wholefoods are good examples of brands using the platform effectively. And you don’t have to be a manufacturer or retailer: Pinterest works equally well for spreading ideas, as organisations like The Guardian and Enough Project are showing. 

If you’re a blogger, Yang of ChilliSauce has written this particularly useful step-by-step guide.

Despite being a social media consultant, I’m a bit of a luddite when it comes to trying new stuff: not enough time or patience. But Pinterest grabbed me right away – mainly because we’d recently moved and I needed home furnishing ideas. Boom! An online moodboard that can be instantly added to and shared – how damn convenient.

Clearly a lot of other people think so too, because Pinterest is growing at a phenomenal rate – currently more than four million users worldwide. Eighty per cent of those are women (although uptake skews towards men in the UK).

First came blogging, then micro-blogging, now photo-blogging. We’re increasingly busy in terms of the daily information we need to process: if a picture paints a thousand words, ideas can be communicated in an instant. It’s no wonder applications like Instagram and Pinterest are of the moment.

Cherry-picking the best stuff

Spring has sprung…and it’s time to get blogging! If you’re an occasional reader of this blog (thank you), you may have noticed a sudden flurry of activity over the last few days. Yes indeed, after nearly a year of inactivity (apart from the odd RSA live blog), I’ve decided to renew my blogging vows.

Yes I DO promise to love, honour and cherish “Monkeys With Typewriters” – lavishing it with more frequent attention and keeping it enhanced, nipped and tucked in all the right places.

It’s been unusually warm and sunny here in London this week, so the perfect time to get down to some social reporting with The RSA, led by the awesome David Wilcox. So far I’ve reported from two events, experimenting with uploading video direct from the iPhone. There’ve been some hiccups along the way, but I’m loving the instantness of everything (point+shoot+blog+connect). Looking forward to doing a lot more of this, and to getting more RSA Fellows on board: the monkeys will out!

Lunch with the fab Jamie Coomber the other week reignited my love of Instagram, so I’ll be using that more, and pinning the results on Pinterest, to see if that ignites any new connections (while still loving Flickr, of course).

Along with RSA social reporting and a more visual style, there’ll be my usual monkey-with-typewriter musings on the impact of social technologies on the way we work: focusing on collaborative, grassrootsy, networked approaches. So yes, I’ll be cherry-picking – but this sector needs some optimism bias (there’s enough dirt-digging already out there).

Finally, I’ll be posting on stuff that ties in with the broader collaborative behaviours identified in Monkeys With Typewriters: co-creation, passion, learning, openness, listening and generosity. So topics will include anything from diversity (listening) through service design (co-creation) to social enterprise (generosity).

At least, that’s how I think it’s going to play out. If it starts raining, I may feel quite differently…