Tag Archives: social proof

Bleach London Psychedelic Soho Hair Rave

Bleach London: the ultimate social salon

Creative, visual and consumer-facing – why would hair salons have a problem with social media? But the conversation on social media in the UK is dominated by just one name: Bleach London.

The Dalston salon’s YouTube channel (above) has 4.7K subscribers. It has 50K fans on Twitter, 70K on Facebook and 240K on Instagram. Bleach’s “how to” videos notch up an average of 11K views, and a new hairstyle can be trending on Twitter within hours (witness the excitement around Lottie Tomlinson’s new #RainbowRoots on 5 November).

Just to put Bleach London’s online presence in context, out of the ten UK salons I surveyed, Bleach takes 74 per cent of social mentions (see Brandwatch graphic below). Bleach London’s nearest rival in terms of social voice comes from Mark Hill in Hull – a savvy salon with its own product line in Boots and a staunch fanbase among Geordie Shore cast members. But Mark Hill still only gets 10 per cent of social mentions.

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Vacancy by Lauren Mitchell

5 things I learnt as an Airbnb Host

For the last six years, we’ve used Airbnb regularly for holiday accommodation. This summer, we decided to take the plunge and put our own property up on Airbnb for rent.

I like the idea of the sharing economy. And I like any organisation that supposedly puts community and social connections at the heart of its business model. So, was the Airbnb hosting experience all it’s cracked up to be? Here’s what I learnt:

1. It’s surprisingly easy

Airbnb has a lovely website. The images are beautiful, the navigation’s clean, and the interface is refreshingly simple and (third party) advertising-free. It costs nothing to “list your space” – and you can do it at the click of a button. Airbnb will even send round a free professional photographer to make your home look extra nice.

It all feels relatively safe and easy – if you’re anything like me, you might give it a try, just to see what happens…
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Beauty and the (social) beast: why do salons struggle to get social media marketing right?

Spa Accents by Karl Cossio

According to latest research from Habia (the government appointed sector skills body), seventy per cent of UK beauty salons use some sort of ICT in running their business. The vast majority of salons who use a computer use it for their company website (77 per cent), for Facebook (73 per cent) and/ or for Twitter (27 per cent).

Marketing and promotion skills are cited as the number one priority in terms of skills business owners would like their staff to have (68 per cent of business owners), but most salons don’t have any kind of training plan or a training budget. I’m taking a wild guess they don’t have a social media marketing strategy either.

I took a sample of ten independent beauty salons and used Brandwatch to track how they performed on social media over one month. The salons are spread across the UK so aren’t directly competing with each other – but I wanted to get a UK-wide feel for best practice – to find who has the best share of voice on social, if you like.

Here’s what I found…

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Why peer recommendation works – my Airbnb experience

Beaching it up in Barcelona
Last month I went to Barcelona with my sisters and a few close girlfriends. The trip was pretty special as I’m about to get married – so this was what you might call a “hen” do. We didn’t want to run around wearing matching pink tracksuits and bunny ears (and I left my “L-plate” and plastic white tiara at home), but we did want to have an amazing time without spending a stupid amount of money.

When it came to sorting a place to stay, Airbnb was the obvious choice. I’ve used the peer-to-peer rental site quite a few times in the past, and they’ve always delivered great places at reasonable cost. So I started carefully sifting through the 400+ apartments (that would accommodate our nine-person party) currently listed on the website. As you can imagine, the whole process took some time so I was thrilled when I finally settled for a place which ticked all the right boxes: central, comfortable single beds for all (no doubles or sofabeds), decent dining area, at least two bathrooms, beautiful decor in traditional Catalan Modernist style.

I paid in full (Airbnb requires full payment in advance to reserve any property), emailed the apartment details to my friends, and started looking forward to a wonderful long weekend in Spain. Imagine how I felt when, the day before we were about to leave, I got an email from the apartment owner offering apologies and saying the apartment had been rendered inhabitable by the previous tenants (aka: trashed).

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Jimmy Savile: an extraordinary popular delusion

Three Wise MonkeysThe past is another country. Let’s not be nostalgic. The Jimmy Savile story is a case in point: it seems many who worked with him saw what he was doing but what they saw was too shocking to calibrate. They literally couldn’t believe their own eyes.

The  more he did it, the more he got away with it. We were stuck in a negative emotional feedback loop. Savile’s public image – that of celebrity, fundraiser and “national treasure” became increasingly powerful.

It’s a modern day version of The Emperor’s New Clothes – an extraordinary popular delusion. We like to think that if it happened again, we would speak out. I sincerely hope so. Photo: Crystal Pajunen